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Press Release Images: Spirit
02-Feb-2004
NASA Dedicates Mars Landmarks To Columbia Crew
Full Press Release
NASA Dedicates Mars Landmarks To Columbia Crew
NASA Dedicates Mars Landmarks To Columbia Crew

An image taken from Spirit's PanCam looking east depicts the nearby hills dedicated to the final crew of Space Shuttle Columbia. Arranged alphabetically from left to right - "Anderson Hill" is the most northeast of Spirit's landing site and 3 kilometers away. Next are "Brown Hill" and "Chawla Hill", both 2.9 kilometers distant. Next is "Clark Hill" at 3 kilometers. "Husband Hill" and "McCool Hill", named for Columbia's commander and pilot respectively, are 3.1 and 4.2 kilometers distant. "Ramon Hill" is furthest southeast of Spiritís landing site and 4.4 kilometers away.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Magic Carpet Shows Its Colors
The Columbia Crew

NASA's Columbia information page

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Magic Carpet Shows Its Colors
Columbia Landmarks From Orbit

An image taken by the Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera of the Columbia Memorial Station and the nearby hills named after the Columbia crew. The 28th and final flight of Columbia (STS-107) was a 16-day mission dedicated to research in physical, life and space sciences. The Columbia crew worked 24 hours a day in two alternating shifts, successfully conducting approximately 80 separate experiments. On February 1, 2003, the Columbia and its crew were lost over the southern United States during the spacecraft's re-entry into Earth's atmosphere.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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