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Press Release Images: Opportunity
05-Dec-2005
NASA's Mars Rovers Continue to Explore and Amaze
Full Press Release
 
This panoramic image is view from the panoramic image from Opportunity shows an outcrop called 'Olympia' along the northwestern margin of 'Erebus' crater
Opportunity's 'Olympia' Panorama

This view from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows an outcrop called "Olympia" along the northwestern margin of "Erebus" crater. The view spans about 120 degrees from side to side, generally looking southward. The outcrop exposes a broad expanse of sulfate-rich sedimentary rocks. The rocks were formed predominantly from windblown sediments, but some also formed in environmental conditions from damp to under shallow surface water. After taking the images that were combined into this view, Opportunity drove along along a path between sand dunes to the upper left side of the image, where a cliff in the background can be seen. This is cliff is known as the "Mogollon Rim." Researchers expect it to expose more than 1 meter (3 feet) of new strata, These strata may represent the highest level observed yet by Opportunity. The image is an approximately true-color rendering generated using the panoramic camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell


Related Animation:
Animation (91.9 MB) | Animation (70 MB)

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This image shows image shows a portion of the rim of 'Erebus Crater'
Rim of 'Erebus'

The center upper portion of this image shows a portion of the rim of "Erebus Crater" in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. This approximately true-color view from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is a composite of frames acquired on the rover's 657th Martian day, or sol, (Nov. 28, 2005). This is a small portion of a large panorama. Other portions of the panorama were still being shot three sols later. This view is a composite of separate images taken through the camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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This image shows the route Opportunity has taken through sol 659 relative to destination 'Victoria Crater'
Partway to 'Victoria'

This image shows the route that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity had driven through its 659th Martian day, or sol, (Dec. 1, 2005) relative to the potential destination of "Victoria Crater" farther south. The base image is a portion of a mosaic (previously released as PIA07506) combining images from the Mars Observer Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter, the Thermal Emission Imaging System on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, and Opportunity's own Descent Image Motion Estimation System. The scale bar at lower right is 800 meters (one-half mile).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/OSU
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This image shows Opportunity's route through sol 656
Opportunity Traverse Map, Sol 656

This image shows the route that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has taken from its landing site inside "Eagle Crater" to its position on its 656th Martian day, or sol, (Nov. 27, 2005) at the edge of "Erebus Crater." The base image is a portion of a mosaic (previously released as PIA07506) combining images from the Mars Observer Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter, the Thermal Emission Imaging System on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, and Opportunity's own Descent Image Motion Estimation System. The scale bar at lower right is 800 meters (one-half mile). As of sol 656, Opportunity had driven a total of 6,502 meters (4.04 miles).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/OSU
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This image shows Opportunity's route through sol 656.  This map is unlabeled
Opportunity Traverse Map, Sol 656 (Unlabeled)

This image shows the route that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has taken from its landing site inside "Eagle Crater" to its position on its 656th Martian day, or sol, (Nov. 27, 2005) at the edge of "Erebus Crater." The base image is a portion of a mosaic (previously released as PIA07506) combining images from the Mars Observer Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter, the Thermal Emission Imaging System on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, and Opportunity's own Descent Image Motion Estimation System. The scale bar at lower right is 800 meters (one-half mile). As of sol 656, Opportunity had driven a total of 6,502 meters (4.04 miles).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/OSU
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