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Press Release Images: Opportunity
24-May-2005
 
This image shows the left front wheel of Opportunity

This image shows the left front wheel of Opportunity
Slow Progress in Dune (Left Front Wheel)

The left front wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's front hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Image (27 KB) | GIF (4.8 MB) | Quick Time (8.8 MB)
This image shows the right front wheel of Opportunity

This image shows the right front wheel of Opportunity
Slow Progress in Dune (Right Front Wheel)

The right front wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's front hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Image (24 KB) | GIF (3.7 MB) | Quick Time (8.8 MB)
This image shows the right rear wheel of Opportunity

This image shows the right rear wheel of Opportunity
Slow Progress in Dune (Right Rear Wheel)

The right rear wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's rear hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The wheel is largely hidden by a cable bundle. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Image (25 KB) | GIF (4.3 MB) | Quick Time (8.8 MB)
This image shows the left rear wheel of Opportunity

This image shows the left rear wheel of Opportunity
Slow Progress in Dune (Left Rear Wheel)

The left rear wheel of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity makes slow but steady progress through soft dune material in this movie clip of frames taken by the rover's rear hazard identification camera over a period of several days. The sequence starts on Opportunity's 460th martian day, or sol (May 10, 2005) and ends 11 days later. In eight drives during that period, Opportunity advanced a total of 26 centimeters (10 inches) while spinning its wheels enough to have driven 46 meters (151 feet) if there were no slippage. The motion appears to speed up near the end of the clip, but that is an artifact of individual frames being taken less frequently.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Image (26 KB) | GIF (3.9 MB) | Quick Time (8.6 MB)

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