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Press Release Images: Opportunity
25-Jun-2004
Mars Rover Surprises Continue; Spirit, Too, Finds Hematite
Full Press Release
The Little Rover that Could
The Little Rover that Could

This image taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows a rover test drive up a manmade slope. The slope simulates one that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity will face on Mars if it is sent commands to explore rock outcrop that lies farther into "Endurance Crater." Using sand, dirt and rocks, scientists and engineers at JPL constructed the overall platform of the slope at a 25-degree angle, with a 40-degree step in the middle. The test rover successfully descended and climbed the platform, adding confidence that Opportunity could cross a similar hurdle in Endurance Crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (45 kB) | Large (500 kB)
'Endurance' Tells Story of Mars' History
'Endurance' Tells Story of Mars' History

This false-color image shows the area inside "Endurance Crater" that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is currently investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the farther back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are "reading" this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments. So far, data from the rover indicates that the top layers are sulfate-rich, like the rocks observed in "Eagle Crater." This image was taken on sol 134 (June 9, 2004) by Opportunity's panoramic camera with the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (57 kB) | Large (829 kB)
The Little Rover that Could
Reading 'Endurance Crater'

This image shows the area inside "Endurance Crater" that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the further back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are "reading" this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments. So far, data from the rover indicate that the top layers are sulfate-rich, like the rocks observed in "Eagle Crater." This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks. This image was taken by Opportunity's navigation camera on sol 134 (June 9, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (61 kB) | Large (448 kB)
Reading 'Endurance Crater' (with labels)
Reading 'Endurance Crater' (with labels)

This image shows the area inside "Endurance Crater" that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the further back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are "reading" this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments.

The layer labeled "A" in this picture contains broken-up rocks that most closely resemble those of "Eagle Crater." Layers "B,C and D" appear less broken up and more finely laminated. Layer "E," on the other hand, looks more like "A." At present, the rover is examining layer "D."

So far, data from the rover indicates that the first four layers consist of sulfate-rich, jarosite-containing rocks like those observed in Eagle Crater. This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks, though the materials themselves may have been laid down by wind.

This image was taken by Opportunity's navigation camera on sol 134 (June 9, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (72 kB) | Large (1.5 MB)
Turning the Pages of 'Endurance Crater's' History (with labels)
Turning the Pages of 'Endurance Crater's' History (with labels)

This image mosaic made up of four images from the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a contact line between two distinct layers of rock (A and B) inside "Endurance Crater." The layers are defined by subtle color and texture variations and represent separate chapters in Mars' history. Contact lines between the layers therefore represent periods of geologic time when significant environmental changes occurred. Data from Opportunity's scientific instruments indicate that both of the shown layers are rich in sulfates. Each microscopic image shows an area of about 3 centimeters by 3 centimeters (1.2 inches by 1.2 inches).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/USGS
Browse Image (68 kB) | Large (849 kB)
'Cobble Hill' Profile
'Cobble Hill' Profile

This mosaic of images taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the finely-laminated target called "Cobble Hill" at "Endurance Crater." Scientists studying the target have determined that the layers within it are rich in sulfate, like many of the rocks in Endurance and "Eagle Crater" that have been investigated so far. This image comprises four separate microscopic images taken on sol 143 (June 19, 2004). The circle is where the rover's rock abrasion tool cut away the rock's surface to expose the interior. It is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/USGS
Browse Image (78 kB) | Large (800 kB)
 
'Endurance' Tells Story of Mars' History
'Endurance' Tells Story of Mars' History

This false-color image mosaic shows the area inside "Endurance Crater" that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is currently investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the farther back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are "reading" this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments. So far, data from the rover indicates that the top layers are sulfate-rich, like the rocks observed in "Eagle Crater." This image was taken on sol 134 (June 9, 2004) by Opportunity's panoramic camera with the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (90 kB) | Medium Image (459 kB) | Large (4.4 MB)
'Cobble Hill' Profile
'Cobble Hill' Profile

This mosaic of images taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the finely-laminated target called "Cobble Hill" at "Endurance Crater." Scientists studying the target have determined that the layers within it are rich in sulfate, like many of the rocks in Endurance and "Eagle Crater" that have been investigated so far. This image comprises four separate microscopic images taken on sol 143 (June 19, 2004). The circle is where the rover's rock abrasion tool cut away the rock's surface to expose the interior. It is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/USGS
Browse Image (69 kB) | Medium (226 kB) | Large (8.5 MB)
 
Browse Image (44 kB) | Large (573 kB)

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